What is Your Skin Trying to Tell You? (Part 2)

What is Your Skin Trying to Tell You?

To keep the body in good health is a duty… otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.
-Buddha

The condition of the skin is a result of many biochemical and physical factors that are subject to change both internally and externally. The purpose of skin care is to maintain skin in it’s most healthy and attractive state. The skin needs many things: water, minerals, lipids, proteins, vitamins, good circulation and elimination.

Skin function can be improved through good nutrition, adequate water intake, sleep, exercise and stress management. These along with a regular skin care program will optimize the skin’s appearance.

A holistic approach to healthy skin care always considers the whole person. The skin is really a mirror for what goes on inside the body. In general, because the skin is a sense organ it is closely related to the emotional state of the individual. Understanding your emotional nature is important to address especially if there are skin issues present. I personally love flower essences and essential oils for support in this area as well as other therapies.

Related to the skin– All substances needed by the body to maintain metabolic functions such as fats and oils especially unsaturated fatty acids, carbohydrates, proteins, phospholipids, vitamins and enzymes.

Foreign to the skin- Substances the body does not need and do not occur in the body as either a whole or part- such as paraffin, plastics, petro-chemicals, parabens, phthalates, formaldehyde, hydroquinone and too many other chemicals to mention here. All synthetic chemicals are highly suspect!

Beauty Counter has created The Never List a handy guide for what you should avoid when buying skin care products and cosmetics. Get your copy of The Never List here.

What does your skin need? Does it need oil or water? Internally and or externally? Are there bumps and if so what kind, what color and where are they?

The skin does not stop at the face… Are there signs of trouble anywhere else on the body?

In Traditional Chinese Medicine different parts of the face and body reflect different organs and meridians. Depending on what is going on with your overall health, the skin will often leave us clues as to where the problem might be and can help us to determine an appropriate plan. Start with changes in diet and skin care and check with your physician or functional medical doctor if you suspect anything serious.

Skin care to consider:

  • Baths
  • Massage oils
  • Compresses
  • Face and body mists
  • Masks
  • Exfoliants
  • Cleansing and wash products
  • Oils and creams
  • Protection- physical sunscreen, clothing
  • Botanical support in the form of herbs, tea, essential oils & flower essences
  • Getting plenty of fresh air/oxygen

The skin responds well to routine. If you do not currently have a skin care program in place, start one. Using The Never List as a guideline, check to see what’s in the products you are using and what you may be exposing yourself to.

If you’re discovering that you don’t like the ingredients in your current products, check out cleaner safer skin care at www.beautycounter.com/gaydering

Drink adequate water and get enough sleep preferably on a routine that your body is accustomed to. So much of the restorative, re-building and clean up activity amongst our cells takes place while we sleep. The term “beauty sleep” is no joke!

Eat a balanced whole foods diet with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, avoid sugar, processed foods and watch the alcohol consumption as well as carbonated beverages.

Remember this beauty rule:
Never go to bed without washing your face no matter what time it is. No exceptions!

Hopefully you found this information useful and have a new interest in taking even better care of your skin. It is time to appreciate all the amazing things your skin does for you. If you have any questions or comments I would love to hear from you.

References:

  • Physiology Of The Skin by Peter Pugliese MD,
  • Chinese Medicine by Tom Williams
  • Principles of Holistic Therapy with Herbal Essences by Dettrich Gumbel